a visual and performing arts middle school and high school

serving grades 6 through 12

1216 East Apache Boulevard

Tempe, Arizona 85281

 

480.481.9235

Academic Curriculum

 

All courses in this section satisfy core academic requirements for NSAA’s Tri-University endorsed diploma. All courses are one year long, and worth one credit. A total of sixteen core credits are required.

 

ENGLISH

Four English credits are required.

ENGLISH COMPOSITION: This entry-level composition course teaches the fundamentals of writing, including spelling, grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure. Genres studied include expository, functional, persuasive, expressive, literary response, and research writing. The study of literature is also integrated into this course, and students will read poetry, drama, short stories, and modern novels. (9-10)

BRITISH or WORLD LITERATURE: This literature course builds on students’ foundational writing skills and deepens their experience of literary comprehension and analysis. Writing genres studied include literary analysis, expository, functional, narrative, expressive, persuasive, and research. Texts studied include classic novels, short stories, poetry, and drama.

Pre-requisite: 1 year of HS English or permission of instructor.(9-10)

AMERICAN LITERATURE: This literature course investigates the cultural dynamics of American history through American literature. Students will explore how some of the great writers from colonial times to the present have helped to create, enforce, or, in some cases, reject, the concept of the American Dream. Writing in multiple genres is combined with literary analysis. Authors studied include Dickinson, Whitman, Thoreau, Twain, Ellison, Eliot, Steinbeck, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Vonnegut, Morrison, O’Brien, and many others. Pre-requisite: 1 year of HS English with grade of A or B or two years of HS English. (10-11)

MYTHOLOGY & THE SHORT STORY: In the fall semester, this literature course provides an introduction to those Western and Eastern mythologies that have had the greatest impact on the Western tradition, and, in the spring semester, transitions to a study of modern short fiction that continues to address the cultural concerns first seen in those mythologies. The course’s broad aim is to consider how myths function as building blocks of culture, and how those elemental questions are still being addressed in the writing of a variety of modern societies. Students will interpret literature through discussion, writing, and creative projects; critical thinking is a key element.

Pre-requisite: 2 years of HS English or permission of instructor. (11-12)

LITERATURE, RHETORIC, & SOCIETY: This upper-level literature and writing course includes a variety of genres as it investigates the individual’s relationship to society. Students relate literary works and their authors to the seminal ideas of their eras. They analyze culturally or historically significant works of British and world literature that reflect the major literary periods and traditions. Students evaluate rhetorical devices, the logic of texts, and authors’ implied assumptions. Short fiction, drama, and major novels are all a part of this thematic survey; authors studied include Shakespeare, Camus, Orwell, Cather, and Hesse. Pre-requisite: 3 years of HS English or permission of instructor. (12)

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION: The purpose of this college level course is to teach students how to read complex texts with understanding and to write prose of sufficient richness and complexity to communicate effectively with mature readers. The course is organized according to the requirements and guidelines of the current AP English Course Description, and, therefore, students are expected to read critically, think analytically, and communicate clearly both in writing and speech. Throughout the course of the year, students will craft a total of five major out-of-class essays, including a full-fledged, year-end research paper. Pre-requisite: 2 years of HS English with grades of A or B and permission of instructor. (Honors 11-12) This course is offered for Dual Enrollment credit through Rio Salado College.

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE & COMPOSITION: This college level literature and writing course is designed to engage students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. The course includes intensive study of representative works from various genres and periods, concentrating on works of recognized literary merit. Writing assignments focus on the critical analysis of literature and include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays. Students will increase their ability to explain clearly and cogently what they understand about literary works and why they interpret them as they do. Pre-requisite: 2 years of HS English with grades of A or B and permission of instructor. (Honors 11-12) This course is offered for Dual Enrollment credit through Rio Salado College.

 

MATHEMATICS

Four Mathematics credits are required.

HONORS MATHEMATICS: We will offer Honors options in Algebra 1-2, Geometry, Algebra 3-4, and Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus each school year, contingent on student interest. All Calculus sections are taught at the Honors level.

ALGEBRA 1-2: This mathematics course provides a strong foundation of Algebra concepts, techniques, and applications to prepare students for more advanced work. Emphasis is placed on problem solving, graphing, and data analysis; technology is employed as a mathematical and learning tool. Pre-requisite: two semesters of Pre-Algebra.

GEOMETRY: This mathematics course investigates the properties and relationships of 2- and 3-dimensional shapes; students will apply spatial reasoning, analyze mathematical situations, and use coordinate geometry to describe spatial relationships. A variety of measurement techniques and formulas will be explored. Pre-requisite: two semesters of Algebra 1-2.

ALGEBRA 3-4: This mathematics course progresses into advanced Algebra concepts, techniques, and applications. Emphasis is placed on problem solving, graphing, and data analysis; technology is employed as a mathematical and learning tool. Pre-requisite: two semesters of Geometry.

MATH ANALYSIS: This mathematics course presents real-world applications such as ranking methods, election theory, estate division, delivery systems, and graph theory. This course also explores topics in probability, such as counting principles, independent and dependent events, mutually exclusive and inclusive events, expected and actual probability, game theory, and odds. Emphasis is placed on group work, self-discipline, and independent thinking. Pre-requisite: two semesters of Algebra 3-4.

TRIGONOMETRY / PRE-CALCULUS: This course is designed to prepare students for a college-level calculus class. Ideas from past courses are reviewed and unified, significant ideas in trigonometry and complex numbers are developed, and the idea of a mathematical limit is introduced. Topics include the study of rational and polynomial functions, as well as trigonometric functions, including graphing, using inverse, and trig identities. Pre-requisite: two semesters of Algebra 3-4. An Honors section of this course may be offered for Dual Enrollment credit through Rio Salado College.

CALCULUS: Calculus offers a college-level introduction to advanced mathematical models of dynamic situations. Perhaps the single most powerful set of tools for developing a deeper understanding of nature, physics, technology and the changing universe, Calculus moves students from the static world of Euclid, 3,000 years past, into the contemporary world of complex, shifting systems. Students use all prior mathematical concepts and skills to engage in a broader, enriched application of math to human culture. The course will unfold through project-based learning, direct applications in the arts, interdisciplinary units and a relaxed, creative and imaginative environment.

Pre-requisite: two semesters of Pre-Calculus & Trigonometry. (This course is Honors only.)

 

Science

Three science credits are required. All NSAA science courses include a laboratory component.

SCIENCE FOUNDATIONS: This laboratory science course introduces the scientific method and the processes by which scientific inquiry generates knowledge; controlled investigations will be conducted and results evaluated and analyzed through a wide range of scientific disciplines. Students will study earth science, oceanography, meteorology, astronomy, and ecological systems, as well as fundamental concepts in chemistry and physics.

BIOLOGY: This laboratory science course is a study of life from its simplest to its most complex forms. Topics studied include the scientific method, cell basics, genetics, evolution, biodiversity, and ecology. Major concepts include the organization of living systems, the interdependence of organisms and their environment, the history of science, and technology in society. Pre-requisite: 1 year of HS Science.

CHEMISTRY: This laboratory science course will provide students with a study of the composition, properties, and changes associated with matter. This will be done by addressing and answering three questions as a guide to understanding. As stated by A Modeling Approach to Chemistry from Arizona State University, these questions are as follows: (1) how do we view matter? (2) how does it behave? and (3) what is the role of energy in the changes we observe? Pre-requisite: 1 year of HS Science and Algebra 1-2.

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY: This laboratory science course is a study of the structure and function of the human body and its systems. Topics include the scientific method, cells and tissues, and skin. Major human systems studied are as follows: skeletal, muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, and reproductive. Pre-requisite: Biology. 11-12 This class is offered alternate years and dependent on student interest and requirement.

PHYSICS: This laboratory science course is a broad coverage of the principles of mechanics and wave motion. The areas covered include: observation and measurement, kinematics, dynamics, work and energy, impulse and momentum, equilibrium of rigid bodies, rotational motion, oscillations, and waves in mechanical media. Pre-requisites: Biology or Chemistry; Geometry.

 

Social Studies

Three credits of Social Science are required.

WORLD HISTORY / GEOGRAPHY: This social science course is an investigation of countries, cultures, and historical events around the world. Countries on all seven continents will be studied through historical, political, economic, and geographical lenses. Historical topics cover a broad range, from the rise of civilizations through the medieval world, the transition to modern times, revolutionary times, industrialization, imperialism, and the contemporary world.

GOVERNMENT / ECONOMICS: This social science course introduces students to the requirements of democratic citizenship. Part one of this course will develop informed, responsible participation in American political life by competent citizens committed to the fundamental values and principles of American constitutional democracy, as students gain an understanding of political relationships. The second half of this course provides students with the opportunity to learn how the nation’s economy works, supply and demand theories, banking and finance, demands of business ownership, and how economic concerns affect governmental decisions and society at-large. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

UNITED STATES / ARIZONA HISTORY: This social science course examines themes and topics in United States history and America’s cultural heritage. Historical events will be studied along with the dynamics of political, economic, and cultural change from the Colonial era through the late 20th century. First semester topics include the American colonies, the American Revolution, the Constitution and Bill of Rights, the War of 1812, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and westward expansion. Second semester topics include the Spanish American War, World War I, the Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II and the Holocaust, the Cold War, the civil rights movement, and the Vietnam war. Pre-requisite: World History / Geography.(11-12)

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY: This history course is an advanced placement version of U.S. History as described above. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and analysis of primary sources in addition to mastering a broad body of historical knowledge. Reading and writing assignments are extended in length and depth, and students are prepared for the AP examination, including the “document-based questions” featured there. Pre-requisite: World History / Geography. (Honors 11-12)

 

Foreign Languages

Two credits of the same foreign language are required.

FRENCH 1-2: This foreign language course introduces students to French culture through the study of the French language and those who speak it. The skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension are developed with an emphasis on basic grammar and conversation. This course is designed to build a strong foundation in the French language. Cultural attitudes, values, and history of the French-speaking world will be explored.

FRENCH 3-4: This foreign language course reinforces the skills of French-language reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension. Conversational skill and more complex grammatical structures is emphasized, and further study of French culture is pursued. Objectives include comprehension of authentic newspaper and magazine articles; understanding idiom and humor; making persuasive arguments; presenting a research project; and becoming conversant with major French literature and authors. Pre-requisite: French 1-2.

SPANISH 1-2: This foreign language course introduces students to Hispanic culture through the study of the Spanish language and those who speak it. The skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension are developed with an emphasis on basic grammar and conversation. This course is designed to build a strong foundation in the Spanish language. Cultural attitudes, values, and history of the Spanish-speaking world will be explored.

SPANISH 3-4: This foreign language course reinforces the skills of Spanish-language reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension. Conversational skill and more complex grammatical structures is emphasized, and further study of Hispanic culture is pursued. Objectives include comprehension of authentic newspaper and magazine articles; understanding idiom and humor; making persuasive arguments; presenting a research project; and becoming conversant with major Spanish literature and authors. Pre-requisite: Spanish 1-2.

ADVANCED FRENCH & SPANISH: Third-year options in both French and Spanish may be available, depending on student demand. If there is insufficient demand to offer separate third-year class sections, NSAA may work with interested students to facilitate their continued study of a foreign language at the community college level. Please inquire. Pre-Requisite: A grade of A or B in a second-year French or Spanish course.

 

Arts Curriculum

All courses in this section satisfy elective arts and academic requirements for NSAA’s Tri-University endorsed diploma. A total of nine elective credits are required; students have the opportunity to take as many as twelve.

 

Literary Arts

Note: Students majoring in literary arts also elect a variety of courses cross-listed under other disciplines, including Theater Studies and Photography.

CREATIVE WRITING I: This literary arts course focuses on the development of each student’s individual writing voice through the guided exploration of a wide range of genres and modes of discourse. This course stresses the writing process, including prewriting, composition, revision, and reflection. Students experience a workshop environment in which they read and respond to one another’s works.

CREATIVE WRITING II-III: This literary arts course is an in-depth continuation of Creative Writing I that allows students to further develop their creative writing talents. Students share their writing in a workshop setting as they edit and revise. Students read critically the work of major authors, conduct research, and make submissions of their own polished writing to literary journals. Pre-requisite: Creative Writing I / II.

PUBLICATION DESIGN: This literary arts course provides instruction in publication creation, design, and management. Fall semester focuses on the basics of visual communication, including typography, spacing, and composition, along with the social, historical, and contemporary contexts of design. Students work in Photoshop, InDesign, and Quark. During the spring, students create the contents, design, and print details of NSAA’s yearbook. Students are assigned specific staff duties as they meet the challenges of deadlines, revisions, and cooperative design.

WRITING FOR JOURNALISM: This literary arts course instructs students in the basics of literary journalism. Students study the profession of journalism, journalistic law and ethics, the characteristics and constraints of journalistic writing, and the editing process. Interviewing, fact-finding, and reporting are all major elements of the course, and students write in a variety of journalistic styles as they explore the roles of media in contemporary culture. This class is offered alternate years and dependent on student interest and requirement.

WRITING FOR STAGE & SCREEN: This literary arts course instructs students in the craft of playwriting and screenwriting. Students will write their own short plays and screenplays, read and study a selection of published plays and screenplays, and provide each other with constructive feedback in a workshop environment. Offered alternate years. This class is offered alternate years and dependent on student interest and requirement.

 

Performing Arts

All performing arts courses include a history component.

Dance

DANCE DEVELOPMENT I-IV: This performing arts course is an introduction to and appreciation of ballet, modern, and jazz dance vocabulary and their principles of movement, technique, and value. This course introduces the student to fundamentals of human movement as applied to dance technique; students dance, stretch, and strengthen to condition the body. No previous dance experience is required, and this course may be repeated for credit.

DANCE TECHNIQUE I-IV: This performing arts course continues a study of ballet, modern, and jazz dance at the intermediate level. Students practice techniques designed to develop the mind, body, and spirit to communicate expressively through movement. Structured technical exercises that condition the body for strength, coordination, and flexibility are continued. Physical activities that focus on the aspects of space, time, shape, and movement dynamics are explored through individual and group participation. Choreography is introduced. Pre-requisite: Audition.

ADVANCED DANCE I-III: This performing arts course continues instruction in classical ballet technique, history, and ballet vocabulary. It also pursues the mastery of jazz & modern technique along with complex center floor combinations. Emphasis is placed on performance and musicality, technique, virtuosity, and creativity. Students develop dances and practice extended sequences as they focus on alignment, fall and recovery, centering, and articulation of the joints. Elements of improvisation and composition are introduced. Students further explore the process of movement abstraction, as well as continuing to investigate the role of dance in society. Pre-requisite: Audition.

CHOREOGRAPHY & DANCE COMPANY: These advanced performing arts courses continue the study of improvisational and choreographic principles with emphasis on dance improvisation, form, content, and evaluative skills. Students will have several performance opportunities that will build their performance skills towards the level of professional dancers. Students are exposed to the audition process as they gain experience in performing. Students will identify and demonstrate a range of choreographic processes, structures, and forms; develop and sustain a portfolio of created works demonstrating their progression of knowledge and skills; create a dance and revise it over time, articulating the reasons for artistic decisions and what was lost and gained through those decisions, and refine technique through self-evaluation and class critique.

Pre-Requisite: Entrance by audition only; must take at least one other Advanced Dance course concurrently.

 

Music

MUSIC THEORY I: This performing arts course further explores music theory and ear training. Theory, the descriptive language of music, is essential for the developing musician. Students will learn to speak this language, and to recognize and identify musical progressions and relationships, through both listening to and reading music. Topics include singing in solfege; identifying intervals, rhythmic phrases, and chords by sight and sound; major and minor scales and modes; key and modal structures; orchestration; and composing.

AP MUSIC THEORY: In this performing arts course, students will strive to master the fundamentals of music: hearing and notating: pitches, intervals, scales and keys, chords, metric organization, and rhythmic patterns. Students will listen to a wide variety of music, including not only music from standard Western tonal repertoire but also contemporary, jazz, and popular music, and the music of non-western cultures. Emphasis is placed on the music of the Common Practice period (1600-1750). The course will progress to more sophisticated tasks, such as: melodic and harmonic dictation; composition of a bass line for a given melody; realization of a figured bass; analysis of repertoire, including melody, harmony, rhythm, texture, and form; and sight-singing. Students will read, notate, compose, sing, and listen to music. Pre-requisite: Music Theory I.

GUITAR I-IV: This performing arts course will train beginning or inexperienced guitarists in fundamental technique and sight reading, laying a proper foundation for further achievement. Both classical and contemporary styles are covered, and students will learn traditional as well as contemporary techniques and improvisational approaches. Subjects include standard notation and tablature; scales, modes and arpeggios; solo and ensemble performance; chord charts and harmonic accompaniment, and more.

PIANO STUDIES I-IV: This performing arts course provides group instruction designed for the beginning through intermediate piano student. Pupils learn to read music and develop technical facility at the piano through preparation and performance of progressively difficult music. Emphasis will be placed on the elements of musical organization, expression and style. Keyboard ensemble activities provide additional opportunities for musical development, and students explore music in a variety of styles, both classical and contemporary.

VOCAL PERFORMANCE I-IV: This performing arts course aims to improve the singer’s vocal techniques: proper posture and breath support, tonal resonance, articulation, vowel placement, control of dynamic level and phrases, and pronunciation. Students’ main objective is to learn songs in different styles and perform them with a strong understanding of the intentions and requirements of those styles. A working knowledge of sight reading is required, and students are strongly encouraged to audition for regional performances. Pre-requisite: Music Theory  (prior or concurrent); This is an advanced class and requires an audition for placement.

JAZZ ENSEMBLE: This performing arts course provides student musicians with the opportunity to hone their ensemble and improvisation skills in the genre of jazz, experiencing music from bebop and free jazz to new swing, jazz rock, and fusion. Students will practice the composition of original music and interpretation of classic works. Pre-requisite: Music Theory (prior or concurrent); This is an advanced class and requires an audition for placement.

CONTEMPORARY MUSIC ENSEMBLE: This performing arts course gives musicians the opportunity to grow in all aspects of their musicianship through continuous ensemble playing. The course will focus on contemporary styles, ranging from jazz and blues to various forms of pop and rock. Players of any acoustic instruments are welcome; students are required to bring their own instrument. Students will focus on interpreting melodies and harmonies from music and memory, making and executing artistic performance decisions, analyzing and arranging music, and increasing musical awareness of and response to fellow ensemble players. Pre-requisite: Music Theory (prior or concurrent); This is an advanced class and requires an audition for placement.

 

Theatre

THEATER STUDIES: This performing arts course provides an overview of theater’s history, styles, social context, and practical application. Students will also be exposed to play analysis and basic performance techniques. This course is required for all Acting and Musical Theater majors. This class is offered alternate years and dependent on student interest and requirement.

THEATER PRODUCTION I-III: This performing arts course offers students experience in all the behind-the-scenes components of theater, including lighting design, set design, and sound design, as well as theatrical carpentry (building fake walls, platforms, and so on), basic electrics, and of course, technical theater safety. Students will learn how to produce a show from beginning to end, including publicity and stage / crew management, and they will also be exposed to the principles of directing. This course is required for all Acting and Musical Theater majors.

BEGINNING ACTING I-IV: This performing arts course introduces basic principles of acting and stage performance. Beginning Acting teaches the foundational skills required for any successful performer. This includes work with vocal projection, enunciation and diction, physical expression and imaginative movement. Students will work with theater games, structured improvisation, poetry interpretations, basic scene work and introductory work with elevated text. Students will strengthen powers of concentration, focus, analysis, imagination, creativity, and empathy that are critical to every art form. No prior theater experience is necessary.

ADVANCED ACTING I-IV: This performing arts course is a continuation of the study of acting through investigating various methods of creating character, text analysis, and performance techniques. Students will explore a broad range of acting techniques; continue to solidify their understanding of the basic methods of building a character; continue the cultivation of artistic aesthetic, along with physical, emotional and imaginative awareness as they relate to scene and monologue study and presentation. Pre-requisite: Beginning Acting.

MUSICAL THEATER I-III: This performing arts course explores the history of the American Musical Theater as well as developing basic skills necessary for performing in Musical Theater. Students will explore Musical Theater and its historical evolution as a performing art form, and will showcase their development in a variety of Musical Theater presentational styles. Students will develop their acting, movement, and vocal performance techniques through active participation and reflection. Pre-requisites: This is an advanced class and requires an audition for placement.

 

Visual Arts: General

All visual arts courses include a history component and senior portfolio.

VISUAL ARTS FOUNDATIONS: This visual arts course focuses on developing the artist’s creativity. Through exploring past art movements and discussions of art history and theory, each student will begin the search for his or her own, honest voice. In the exploration of art history, the students will create their own versions of these ideas and add to their physical skills. In addition, the assignments will contain most of the skills needed to learn the fundamentals of the given medium; the course explores drawing, painting, 2-D design, and 3-D design. Guest lecturers from a variety of visual disciplines will be featured periodically. This course is the foundation for all advanced visual arts courses.

 

Visual Arts

All visual arts courses include a history component.

Drawing and Painting

DRAWING I-III: This visual arts course extends students’ drawing skills in the following areas: perspective, value, composition, techniques for copying images; it also introduces new drawing techniques. Students build an understanding of those basic elements while having more freedom in their assignments. Verbal and written artistic abilities are also a focus, as the students will further develop their art vocabulary, critique and discussion skills, and the study of art history. Pre-requisite: Visual Arts Foundations (prior or concurrent).

LIFE DRAWING I-II: This visual arts course is a studio art class that teaches the student to draw the human figure using a variety of techniques. Both skeletal and muscular anatomies are studied, and students will draw from live models (parental consent for model drawing is required in order to elect this course). Topics include “sighting” the model, gesture drawing, enveloping, blocking in light and shadow, and the model in motion, among others. Pre-requisite: Drawing I.

PAINTING I: This visual arts course provides a foundation in painting art history, the application of paint, color theory, creating and organizing compositions, observational painting from life, and building painting supports. Students will work to discover, develop, and progress their individual creative voices. Topics include surface quality, value, contrast, hue, saturation, opacity, transparency, color relativity, diffusion, pattern concepts, and more. Pre-requisite: Visual Arts Foundations (prior or concurrent).

PAINTING II-III: In this visual arts course, intermediate-level students build upon their foundation-level painting skills. Advanced students will work in a largely self-directed manner with an emphasis on progressing their individual creative voices and learning how to employ symbolic metaphor for deeper meaning. Students will develop their body of work to prepare a portfolio for college admissions while extending their understanding through the study of painting history. Pre-requisite: Painting I / II.

 

Digital Arts, Photography, and Film

DIGITAL GRAPHIC DESIGN I: This visual arts course is an introduction to digital arts. Students will learn to create original artworks using the computer as a creative tool. Artworks will be created in Adobe Photoshop; students will learn to use a scanner and digital camera to manipulate the images. Digital arts history, theory, and design fundamentals for digital image-making will be addressed throughout the course. Course projects include digital art studies, retouching, compositing, illustration, identity design, color matching and composition studies, photorealistic imaging, color correction, and art exhibition development. Pre-requisite: Visual Arts Foundations (prior or concurrent).

DIGITAL GRAPHIC DESIGN II-III: This visual arts course is an upper-level course in digital arts. Students will learn Adobe Illustrator in addition to Adobe Photoshop. Digital arts history, theory, and design fundamentals for digital image-making will be addressed. Students will look at artists’ work that uses the computer as a medium, and discuss digital arts in the context of the wider art world and culture. Course projects in Illustrator include selection, drawing, and pen tools, layers, transformations, distortions, type tools, and modifying paths and shapes. Students will create a body of work for their final portfolio requirements using both Photoshop and Illustrator. Pre-requisite: Digital Arts I.

DIGITAL MIXED MEDIA: This visual arts course explores fundamentals of digital photography and fine art making through Photoshop CS5. Collage and creative investigation mesh with technical skill-building as students develop an understanding of digital fine art while building a portfolio of original work, as well as studying art in context with today’s society and culture. Pre-requisite: Visual Arts Foundations (prior or concurrent).

PHOTOGRAPHY I: This visual arts course is an introduction to black and white photography. We learn the technical aspects of photography including camera parts and functions, film processing, and all facets of printing a black and white photograph. We discuss the photography within its context in the art world. We hold class critiques and begin to develop a vocabulary specific to the medium. By the end of the class, students will be competent in the basic steps necessary to conceive a black and white photograph, and able to produce prints which are not only technically proficient, but also meaningful to them as artists. Pre-requisites: Students must have a 35mm manual camera.

PHOTOGRAPHY II-III: This visual arts course is an intermediate course in black and white photography, designed for students who have a solid basic knowledge of shooting, processing, and printing silver gelatin, black and white prints. Students will refine and expand their technical knowledge, learn better darkroom control and a variety of techniques in print manipulation. They will also be introduced to hand-coated emulsions and alternative printing surfaces. Through reading, writing, and critiques, the class will explore various genres and styles of photography, along with some of the ideas and works of both contemporary and historical photographers. Pre-requisite: Photography I.

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY: This visual arts class explores the use of Digital SLR cameras incorporated with computer editing software. It combines the use of Photoshop and the elements of photography to create digital images. This class involves technical and artistic skills combined.

 

3-D Design

CERAMICS I: This visual arts course offers an introduction to ceramic hand building and decorating methods. Students will achieve a basic awareness of historical and contemporary ceramics, and the ethnic and cultural diversity in ceramic form and process worldwide. Elements of ceramics include basic wheel-throwing techniques, glaze materials, firing methods, and clay materials, as well as an appreciation of fine craft enhanced by creative visualization and self-expression. Pre-requisite: Visual Arts Foundations (prior or concurrent).

CERAMICS II-III: This visual arts course offers a further exploration of ceramic hand building and decorating methods. Students learn a variety of surface decoration methods and materials while developing their understanding of every pot as an expressive, sculptural piece that communicates a message through surface, form, and function. Students consider elements of design and physical expression while increasing their aesthetic and technical understanding of ceramics as a fine art form. Pre-requisite: Ceramics I.

FASHION DESIGN I: This visual arts course will explore the history of fashion, societal influences, important designers throughout time, and fashion versus function. Drawing, research, and illustrating will occupy the bulk of instructional time, with sewing machine work beginning later in the school year. Students will learn how to use the tools involved with designing patterns and clothing. Pre-requisite: Visual Arts Foundations (prior or concurrent).

FASHION DESIGN II-III: This visual arts course is a continuation of its beginning level; in addition to extending above topics, students construct a full line as the highlight of the school’s fashion shows. Pre-requisite: Fashion Design I / II.

MIXED MEDIA I: This visual arts course provides a foundation in painting/mixed media contemporary art, including application of paint acrylic mediums and various other media such as beeswax, oil pastels, collage, oil paint, papermaking, screen printing, watercolor, gouache, linoleum block printing and bookmaking. Students will progress and expand their knowledge of color theory, creating and organizing compositions, and building painting supports. Through the study of these techniques, students will develop their own artistic voices along with deeper understanding and representation of significant content in their work. Pre-requisite: Visual Arts Foundations (prior or concurrent).

MIXED MEDIA II-III: This visual arts course continues with the contemporary painting/mixed media applications and techniques learned in Mixed Media I. Students explore a variety of new techniques and combine familiar methods in innovative ways to express their creative voices as they use metaphor to deepen the meaning of their work. Pre-requisite: Mixed Media I / II.

SCULPTURE: This visual arts course explores the basic principles that govern 3-dimensional design. Emphasis will be placed on developing sculptural forms and their relationship to space. Students are introduced to various materials and sculptural techniques. Assignments will include paper-cut relief sculptures, jewelry construction and design, alternative mold making and casting techniques, and art installation. Pre-requisite: Visual Arts Foundations. This class is offered alternate years and dependent on student interest and requirement.

 

Pursuant to A.R.S. §38-431.02, NSAA High School and Middle School hereby states that all notices of the meetings of NSAA High School and Middle School will be posted on the bulletin board in the main building of the school for announcements and on our website calendar. The location is open to the public Monday through Friday from 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM. Such notices will indicate the date, time, and place of the meeting and will include an agenda or information concerning the manner in which the public may obtain an agenda for the meeting